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Foreign hanok defenders battle obliteration of Seoul's architectural heritage

SEOUL, Sept. 3 (Yonhap) -- With the number of hanok, or traditional Korean cottages, dwindling almost daily in Seoul as the modernization of the capital marches onward, two overseas residents in Seoul have emerged as among their most vocal defenders.
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