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Samsung to switch to Microsoft Word for office software

2014/09/30 14:26

By Kang Yoon-seung

SEOUL, Sept. 30 (Yonhap) -- South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. said Tuesday it will switch to using Microsoft Corp.'s document and word-processing software from its own system starting Jan. 1.

Samsung affiliates have been using JungUm Global, an office document software program developed independently, since 1994. The phaseout of JungUm Global will start with Samsung Electronics and eventually expand to the rest of the company, although a detailed plan has not yet been set, the company said.

Samsung said the move came as Microsoft's flagship program, Word, dominates 90 percent of the market, and its usage will make communications with Samsung's other business partners easier. The program's compatibility with other document software, such as Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint, will also add to the convenience, it said.

"Since MS Word supports almost all operating systems, such as Windows, Android and Linux, our staff can also work in a smart manner through PC, smartphones, and tablets," it said in its release.

South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. said Sept. 30, 2014, that it will begin using Microsoft Corp.'s popular document program throughout the company, eventually aiming to phase out its own system, JungUm Global. (Yonhap) South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. said Sept. 30, 2014, that it will begin using Microsoft Corp.'s popular document program throughout the company, eventually aiming to phase out its own system, JungUm Global. (Yonhap)

Since JungUm Global is also being used by a handful of non-Samsung users, the firm said it will open a consumer relations center through 2019 for business clients. Individuals can use the program "permanently," even after Samsung suspends its support for the software.

The relationship between Samsung and Microsoft turned icy after the U.S. firm sued Samsung Electronics in August to force the South Korean company to continue to pay royalties for technology used in the Android smartphone operating system.

The two signed a cross-licensing agreement in 2011, but Samsung had refused to pay royalties after Microsoft announced its intent to acquire Nokia.

colin@yna.co.kr

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