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Job quality at public agencies worsens despite more hiring

2018/05/09 14:03

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SEOUL, May 9 (Yonhap) -- The quality of jobs at South Korea's public institutions has worsened over the past year despite a solid increase in their payrolls, a market tracker said Wednesday.

According to CEO Score, 361 state firms and public agencies had a combined workforce of slightly over 456,800 as of the end of March this year, up 6 percent from the start of last year.

The number of nonregular employees tumbled 22 percent, or 8,295, over the cited period, but that of indefinite-term contract workers, or those who are hired to contracts without fixed terms, soared 48 percent (11,371).

The figure for outsourced workers also climbed 12 percent, or 10,315.

In contrast, those public institutions added 12,355 more regular workers to their payrolls during the period, up 4.3 percent. The growth rate was slightly higher than the 4.2 percent gain recorded a year earlier.

This file photo, taken Aug. 30, 2017, shows a debate on the Moon Jae-in government's public sector employment policy taking place in Seoul. (Yonhap) This file photo, taken Aug. 30, 2017, shows a debate on the Moon Jae-in government's public sector employment policy taking place in Seoul. (Yonhap)

The public institutions include those that have disclosed related information on the state portal All Public Information in One (ALIO).

"The drop in the number of temporary workers at public institutions since the inauguration of the Moon Jae-in administration has resulted in increased indefinite-term contract workers and outsourced employees," CEO Score said. "That runs counter to its pledge to convert temps into full-time workers."

   President Moon Jae-in, who marks his first year in office Thursday, has pledged to remove all nonregular jobs in the public sector during his five-year term as part of his signature job creation campaign. He has also promised to create 810,000 new quality jobs in the public sector over the next five years.

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