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Recent exodus of N.K. officials won't lead to regime collapse: experts

2015/07/06 14:19

SEOUL, July 6 (Yonhap) -- North Korea may continue to see its officials desert the communist country to settle abroad down the road, but the exodus is not likely to lead to the collapse of the regime, experts said Monday.

North Korea is believed to be coping with an increased number of defections by government officials as of late with frequent fears of purging and punishment haunting North Korean officials under leader Kim Jong-un.

About 10 North Korean military and party officials have reportedly fled the communist country recently in their pursuit of asylum in South Korea or in a third country.

Those defectors reportedly included a mid-ranking North Korean party official who sought asylum in the South with his family early this year while he was managing slush funds in Hong Kong for leader Kim.

Another high-ranking military official also reportedly has been staying in a country outside of South and North Korea since fleeing the communist country.

The recent outflow may continue in the future as more officials terrified of Kim's "reign of terror" are likely to renounce their allegiance to the communist country, experts noted.

"For the time being, North Korean officials are likely to continue to flee the communist country or seek asylum, which would weaken the regime of the North's leader Kim Jong-un," said Chang Yong-seok, a researcher at the Institute for Peace and Unification Studies at Seoul National University.

Kim Yong-hyun, a professor of North Korean studies at Dongguk University, also noted, "Desertion by these people may take place intermittently in the process of solidifying the Kim Jong-un regime and securing the regime's stability."

   Since taking power in late 2011 after his father Kim Jong-il's sudden death, the junior Kim has resorted to unusually brutal means to solidify his power base.

In late 2013, Jang Song-thaek, the husband of Kim's aunt and once the country's second most powerful official, was executed on charges of treason, along with many other officials with close ties with Jang.

Former defense chief Hyon Yong-chol was also purged in late April apparently due to his disloyalty to Kim.

Still, experts stressed that the terror-driven exodus may not immediately lead to a collapse of the Kim regime although it is likely to resort to military provocations outside the country in order to quell potential political instability inside.

"If Kim's reign of terror prolongs, his governing style could bring about an instability in the communist country," said Jung Sang-don, a research fellow at the Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA). "Then, there is a possibility that North Korea could make provocations in a bid to tide over its internal problems."

   Yang Moo-jin, a professor at the University of North Korean Studies, also dismissed the view that a series of defections by officials meant instability in Kim's regime, saying that there have been no signs of abnormal activities among the North Korean military power or other citizens.

sooyeon@yna.co.kr

pbr@yna.co.kr

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