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S. Korean president to meet N. Korean leader's sister

2018/02/10 06:00

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SEOUL, Feb. 10 (Yonhap) -- South Korean President Moon Jae-in was set to hold a rare meeting Saturday with high-ranking North Korean officials, including leader Kim Jong-un's sister.

The meeting will be held from 11 a.m. at Seoul's presidential office Cheong Wa Dae, followed by lunch hosted by Moon, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokesman Kim Eui-kyeom.

The meeting comes one day after Moon and the North Korean officials attended the opening of the Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang located some 180 kilometers east of Seoul.

In the photo, taken Feb. 9, 2018, Kim Yo-jong (second from L), a younger sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, is seen attending a brief meeting with South Korean officials after arriving at Seoul's Incheon International Airort as part of a 22-member delegation to the opening of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, led by the North's ceremonial head of state Kim Yong-nam (third from L). (Yonhap) In the photo, taken Feb. 9, 2018, Kim Yo-jong (second from L), a younger sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, is seen attending a brief meeting with South Korean officials after arriving at Seoul's Incheon International Airort as part of a 22-member delegation to the opening of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, led by the North's ceremonial head of state Kim Yong-nam (third from L). (Yonhap)

The North Korean delegation, led by the ceremonial head of state Kim Yong-nam, arrived here Friday for a three-day visit. The group includes three other officials -- the North Korean leader's sister Kim Yo-jong, who is deputy chief of the ruling party's propagnda department, Choe Hwi, the chairman of the National Sports Guidance Committee, and Ri Son-gwon, the head of the North's state agency in charge of inter-Korean affairs.

All of them will attend the meeting with Moon, the Cheong Wa Dae spokesman said.

Kim Yo-jong's trip was taken as a surprise as she is the first member of the North's ruling family to visit the South.

South Korea and the North technically remain at war as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty.

The two Koreas have held two inter-Korean summits, in 2000 and 2007, both in Pyongyang.

bdk@yna.co.kr

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