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Yonhap News Summary

2018/01/11 13:16

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The following is the first summary of major stories moved by Yonhap News Agency on Thursday.

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Inter-Korean talks on PyeongChang to open before IOC meeting: Seoul

SEOUL -- South and North Korea will likely hold working-level talks on the North's participation in the PyeongChang Winter Olympics before the International Olympic Committee (IOC)'s meeting slated for late next week, Seoul officials said Thursday.

The IOC announced Thursday that it will convene a meeting with officials from the two Koreas on Jan. 20 in Lausanne, Switzerland to discuss the issue.

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Trump hopes inter-Korean talks lead to 'success for the world'

WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump voiced hope Wednesday that recent high-level talks between South and North Korea will lead to "success for the world."

   The two Koreas met for the first time in more than two years Tuesday and agreed to hold military talks to ease tensions along their border. North Korea also agreed to send a delegation to the PyeongChang Winter Olympics in the South next month.

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PM calls for rooting out fraudulent claims of gov't subsidies

SEOUL -- Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon called Thursday for rooting out fraudulent claims for government allowances and subsidies for the underprivileged as the government announced a set of measures to better clamp down on such irregularities.

"The total amount of state subsidies more than doubled over the past 10 years, but the level of people's confidence in whether subsidies are strictly implemented is not high," Lee said during a weekly government policy coordination meeting.

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(News Focus) S. Korea faces balancing act between sanctions and support for N.K. joining Olympics

SEOUL -- With North Korea set to join next month's Winter Olympics in the South, the Seoul government appears to be struggling with how to accommodate a large-scale delegation of North Korean officials and athletes without violating multiple-layered sanctions against Pyongyang.

Some say that the government should consider easing sanctions temporarily as a way to facilitate a thaw in inter-Korean relations through the sporting event. There are still calls to not go so far as to undermine the international sanctions regime that will be critical in applying pressure on the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs.

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(LEAD) Gov't to give tax breaks, ease listing rules to boost KOSDAQ market

SEOUL -- The government will give tax breaks to individuals that invest in mutual funds for startups and soften some listing rules for the junior KOSDAQ stock market, officials said Thursday.

The move is part of a new policy move to boost the KOSDAQ market and help smaller firms raise funds through the stock market, the Financial Services Commission (FSC) said in a statement.

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World skating body says N. Korea has met 'technical requirements' for PyeongChang Olympics

SEOUL -- The world's skating governing body said Thursday that North Korea has met the "technical requirements" to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea.

The International Skating Union (ISU) also said it will refer the matter of North Korea's late entry in figure skating to the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

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Prosecutors raid auto parts maker linked to ex-president over suspected slush fund

SEOUL -- Prosecutors raided the headquarters of a local auto parts maker Thursday as part of an investigation into allegations that the company has kept a secret fund for former President Lee Myung-bak.

Investigators from the Seoul Central District Prosecutors' Office searched the premises of DAS headquarters in Gyeongju, 371 kilometers southeast of Seoul, and confiscated evidence, according to the prosecution.

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(Yonhap Interview) U.S.-born hockey forward enjoys 'awesome' chemistry with S. Korean brothers

JINCHEON, South Korea -- They may have been born in different countries, but there's no denying outstanding on-ice chemistry between the two homegrown brothers, Kim Ki-sung and Kim Sang-wook, and U.S.-born forward Mike Testwuide on the top line of the South Korean men's hockey team.

And Testwuide, a Colorado native who acquired his South Korean passport in 2015, wouldn't want to play on any other line.

(END)

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